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bob dole took to the senate floor in his wheelchair to push for support of the united nations treaty that helps disabled people around the world. despite that, senators voted against the treaty, something that would presumably have had a wide margin of support. >> i've heard from advocacy group s consisting of people w hope that this treaty will protect disabled americans who will protect them as they travel abroad. i've also heard from parents of disabled children that this treaty will threaten their rights as parents. >> i sympathize with john boehner. the tea party has a firm grip on the republican party and that's obvious, what's happened this morning here in washington. >> in rejecting this treaty, the united states broke from 125 countries that have ratified the treaty, including syria and saudi arabia. senate republicans actually voted to approve the measure, like senator john mccain and kelly ayotte, to name a few. others b others band together saying that if passed it will inhibit people in the united states. ana navaro and maria cardona joins us. in john mccain's words pro
dole, why is he not here? he's not here to advocate for the united nations and certainly this man is not here because he doesn't want to defend the sovereignty of the united states of america. he is here because he wants to know that other countries will come to treat the disabled the way we do. he's here because he wants to know that when a disabled american veteran or wounded warriors travel overseas, that they are treated with the same dignity and respect that they receive here at home. that's why an 89-year-old veteran one week removed from the bethesda naval hospital comes back to the senate on an early december day, because it matters. because what we do here in the united states senate matters. not just to us but to people all across the globe. >> that's pretty powerful stuff. and after all of that, bob dole was wheeled off of the floor with his wife and then the vote came and it was rejected. it was rejected. wolf blitzer is with us now to talk a little bit more about this. on its surface, wolf blitzer, it would seem like political suicide to vote down a treaty that promot
nations would be able to tell people in the united states how to deal with his daughter isabella and some republicans were citing that as a reason for rejecting the treaty. what do you say in. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife and their daughter and family, he's a strong family man. he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero -- i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. there is no ability to go to court. there is not one requirement of a change in american law. and there is no way to tell an american parent anything. now, that is according to our supreme court of the united states. that's according to the language in the treaty itself. and this is a treaty that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornbur
's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> the democratic republic of congo is a nation the size of western europe. it may be in for violent regime change, rebels called m 23 have gained ground in recent weeks. congo was the setting for joseph conrad's "heart of darkness." that darkness hasn't lifted in 110 years since the story was published. in the last 14 years alone, 5.4 million died in congo as a result of conflict and humanitarian crisis. jeff, why is it that the crisis seems to be heating up? you point out that the congo that the government's army is losing battle after battle. being routed in battle after battle by the rebels. >> i think this is really an issue of state failure. i've been covering congo for six years and i've seen the country get weaker and weaker since i began. there was a big election in 2006 that created a lot of hope and enthusiasm that things were turning around. they haven't. since then, the government has become more authoritarian, more corrupt, more rebel groups. what we are seeing is a symptom and cause. it's a symptom of this weak state that can't control
, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic action and then in her words, go down in flames. >> so, why religious leaders, especially these two, speakin
to the united nations, susan rice comes under fire again. this time, it's over rwanda. let's go "outfront. >>> good evening, welcome, everyone. "outfront" tonight breaking news, president obama puts the syrian president on notice. the president is reacting to new evidence that assad's regime has started mixing chemicals to make deadly sarin gas, adding to its massive stockpile of chemical weapons. >> and today i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> assad is on the edge of president obama's so-called red line against syria. the president said this summer that syria's use or movement of chemical weapons could mean u.s. intervention. so outfront tonight, barbara star. how exactly -- how clear is the evidence that they are moving in a new step with chemical weapons. >> it was just over the weekend in the last few days the intelligence began coming in.
crimes for the united nations, searching for mass graves in places like yugoslavia and peru. have you done just this area? or all over? >> all of it. >> reporter: her team used high-tech equipment to scan into the ground. all the red suggests the location of possible grave sites. we won't know for sure unless exhumations are ordered. florida state officials won't comment until they can review kimmerly's findings. >> these are children who came here and died for one reason or another. literally have been lost in the woods. and it's about restoring dignity and helping, if not putting a name to them, at least marking them and acknowledging that they're here. >> reporter: the anthropologists also studied historic documents and public records and discovered a disturbing discrepancy. boys unaccounted for. >> this was the last pictures we had of him. >> reporter: her brother was sent here in 1940. she says owen smith dreamed of playing guitar in nashville. the 14-year-old had a musician's vagabond soul. he was shipped to reform school for stealing a car. she never saw him again. her family w
she be confirmed? not just because of benghazi but because of her whole body of work as the united nations ambassador? >> well, she does have an unusually large number of enemies on capitol hill because of things that have happened in the past, certainly john mccain because of the campaign. but others that she has antagonized along the way. but what's interesting here is the more republicans are pushing back on this, it puts the president in a position of perhaps he wasn't going to nominate her before but it's almost like he can't back down from the fight now and he needs to spend his political capital on this fight. so the others are probably having the reverse effect of that which they are intending. if the president wants to put up a fight, he can get her confirmed by the senate. the question is, is that what he wants to spend his political capital on? >> absolutely. one of the things i see this play out, some of the senators are really punishing president obama for winning in part because they believe that rice lied to make it seem less than it really was leading up to the elec
is about. >> here at cn we all remember the day that your husband, ambassador to the united nations richard holbrooke died unexpect unexpectedly. you write about that day and the memorial. why don't you share with us. >> that was a day that started as all of my days for 17 years. started with a phone call from richard who, as you know, was always in a troubled spot. islamabad, kabul. on this day he was actually en route to the white house. we were making our christmas plans and laughing and joking on the phone and all was well, and an hour later i had a call if there the ambulance that was taking him to the emergency room and that was our last conversation. and then being the wife of such a public man, my morning cou ii mourning could not stay private and i understand that. and i had to plan a memorial that was worthy of such a public man, and that imposed its own stresses. but at the same time, it was a balm, reassuring to me to have discovered that richard had touched so many lives around the world and letters kept pouring in and i red each one. but in reading those letters, decided that
at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then why -- why religious leaders, especially these two speaking out against her, drug and alcohol abuse is up.
's helpful to americans when so many senior politicians trash the u.n. you know? it's the united nations. and actually, it's better for america. >> absolutely. >> the united nations takes a lot of the work on the ground in these places. >> you're absolutely right. but there's human rights abuses that are exploding all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers bill. in the united states, farm workers don't have a right to overtime pay. they don't have a right to form a union. they can be fired. there's plenty of work to do here. >> as a kennedy, i've met quite a few k
. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as well, rick santorum, whose 4-year-old daughter bella is disabled. he was one of the treaty's strongest proponents. here's what he said last month. >> this is a direct assault on us and our family to han
who are saying that in light of the vote at the united nations where the palestinians managed to get that upgraded status, that all of those assurances are null and void, michael. >> all of this pressure that's being put on. israel has been good at ignoring outside pressure on anything. i'm curious about the palestinian side. that u.n. status upgrade does, of course, given the palestinians potential access to a whole raft of u.n. bodies, including the international criminal court. what are the palestinians saying about their options going forward? >> well, the palestinians are saying that all opings are on the table. of course aring the palestinian authority condemned the fact that these housing places were now back on the table, and, of course, they are saying that one of the avenues that they might pursue is the international criminal court, as you said, as a nonmember observer state in the u.n. general assembly. they have access to the international criminal court, and one of the big issues has always been the israeli settlement building in the west bank, which, of course, is seen
't understand it or he was just not factual in what he said because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean zero ability to order or to tell or to -- they can suggest. they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> and yet the treaty was struck down. senator kerry was referring there as well to rick santorum's daughter, bella. senator santorum's daughter has a genetic disorder and senator kerry says that senator santorum and other republicans that voted against the treaty did so because they hate the united nations. more meetings, more talking. sad to report no real solution today and that pretty much sums up the fiscal cliff negotiations. i feel like a broken record. here we go again on the countdown. day 26. got another 24 hours closer to the edge of the fiscal cliff which is why we have our eyes on the white house press briefing. got a live picture ready for you so we don't miss anything. for what it's worth, president obama and house speaker boehner are talking. they had a nice telephone conversation. that's terrific. the firs
has blocked action of president assad at the united nations insisting there should be no regime change. but diplomats now say moscow increasingly doubts assad can survive in power as the armed opposition gains ground. some u.s. senators say now is the time for russia to act. >> this is an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force at a time of great need. and you have a unique capability as a nation to do some good. >> reporter: for the u.s., the insurgents gains are a double-edged sword. some of the most ruthlessly affected fighters also are the most radicalized. washington is moving to declare one of those groups a terrorist organization. but the obama administration worries that the stronger radical fighters become the more armed combat, not political efforts to find a solution will decide the outcome in syria. early next week secretary clinton travels to morocco for a meeting of the so-called friends of syria group. the focus will be on the opposition with the obama administration taking the first steps towards officiall
in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything other this treaty. nothing. >> well, as we told you last night former republican, repeat, republican attorney general testified before the senate foreign relations committee in july basically saying exactly that. there's no nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s. laws. that didn't stop senator santorum to send out this e-mail. you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you the united states senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of persons with disables and said it would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids need to make. had it been the law of the land it would have trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. that is not true. so, why the fudging of facts and we asked senator santorum on the program. he, too
't for you, the u.s. senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of person with disability. he went on to say, quote, this treaty would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. again, that's not true. why the fudging of facts? we asked senator santorum on the program tonight. he declined, and like the others that won't explain themselves, we can guess their motivations and frankly it's so baffling we're taking wide guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr. is a health care attorney and advocate for people with disabilities. when he was 12 years old he lost his leg to bone cancer. there's a picture of him taken with his dad six years after that. he's a strong support either of
it or was not factual in what he said. the united nations has zero ability to order or to tell or to even, they can suggest but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> tonight many disability advocate's rights say that the treaty trumps rights everywhere. he is the first quadrapalegic senator to serve in the house. you voted for this. why do you think it is so important? >> first of all, thank you for having me on the program. thank you for paying attention to this important issue. this is important for people here and for people around the world who don't yet enjoy the protections that people here enjoy in the united states. that law has transformed the lives of people with disabilities and i can speak to that first hand. i was injured in 1980 and i became paralyzed after a gun accident. i know what the world was like both before and after the ada. it is remarkably different. it is a shame that the senate couldn't pass that act yesterday. but i want to thank them for their leadership. the bipartisan support of the 61 senators who did vote
the united nations held a global conference on the benefits of eating insettings, even suggest it might be a good solution to world hunger. >> i don't know why the united states doesn't eat insects. they're very healthy for you. >> he is right. insects are high in protein, low in fat and cholesterol. take a cricket, for example. a six ounce serving of these crunchy bugs have 60% less saturated fat as the same amount of ground beef. >> now the ants. >> these potatoes aren't complete without adding some dried ants. >> sour, tangy, and they have a hint of black pepper to them. >> they also have 14 grams of protein per serving. with the growing population and rising cost of food, the rest of the world just might be on to something. now, if you plan to give bugs a try, do make sure you get them from a certified seller or restaurant. some bugdz may have chemicals on them, so you don't want to pluck them from your own backyard. >>> superstar athletes are years in the making, but sometimes the pressures to be perfect can push anyone over the edge. i want you to meet joe. he turned to drugs and
iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ >>> the united nations the p palestinian authority was greated nonmember observer status. what's the only other entity with that status? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go do cnn.com/fareed. you can follow us on twitter and facebook. go to itunes.com/fareed for our podcast. you can get a audio version for free or buy the book version. he inverted the idea what would make a system or country or individual anti-fragile. if you go to our conversation in the last segment you can tell this will is a fascinating book. for the last look. political sign professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twilights and turns to accommodate people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they bu
recognized by the united nations. the joy short-lived. how israel's decision to pursue even more settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem may kill any hopes of peace. we'll dive deep lie into this issue. >>> rp says it's not changing plans for the controversial housing development in east of jerusalem also developments in east jerusalem. this is despite getting a diplomatic mackdown recently from australia, five european countries and the united states bought in on this yesterday. now here's why this is such a big deal. the proposed construction would effectively cut off the west bank from cities of like bethlehem and ramallah, will cut them off from jerusalem. and that's important for the palestinians, it would mean that they couldn't get to east jerusalem, which they would eventually claim as the capital of their nation if that is to be. the large israeli settlement town of ma ale adumim would be connected to jerusalem directly. vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center. always good to talk to you. israel defined as i i
won a historic vote at the united nations, it's a vote that raises their status and could be a possible step forward official state hood. now rarely says it may be ready to build thousands of new housing units in territories they occupy. earlier i spoke with israel's deputy ministry of foreign affa affairs, i asked him why now? >> our buildings, not only from our right, as it is international but it is our homeland, but also a force for strategy teakics and security interests. we're talking about a country that's nine miles wide, this occupies less than one-third of the middle east. i think it is a right to make sure that we have secured and defensible borders, especially in light of all of the animosity and the hatred that the palestinians and other extremists say in the islamic world are throwing at us. but, let me tell you one thing, deborah, is israel has always been ready for a compromise for peace, for concessions and wherever we build, it's in areas that for certain will stay in any future agreement within israeli territories. >> when you call this strategic, effect
. they believe that this is a cover for testing the long-range missile technology, which is banned by the united nations. one senior government official here in seoul tells me that a motivation behind this rocket launch may also be domestic instability. the source says that kim jong-un's rule may not be as secure as previously thought. and this kind of rocket launch could deflect any attention from that. tom? >> as you may recall, the last launch there did not go very well at all. >>> next to gaza city, where after 45 years in exile, one of the founders of hamas, khalid meshaal, made a historic return today. the pomp and circumstance surrounding his visit underscored the organization's powerful influence among palestinians. cnn's fred pleitgen was there. >> reporter: he received a triumphal welcome when he entered gaza. tens of thousands of hamas fighters lined the street wearing ski masks and combat fatigues and flashing their weapons, including ak-47s and rocket-propelled grenades. the official reason why meshaal is here after never having been in gaza before is the 25th anniversary of the fou
.s. ambassador to the united nations, is thought to be a leading contender. some republicans have been highly critical of rice following the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they got a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secreta secretary. >> reporter:. i. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> reporter: it is a list that includes michelle flournoy who held the number three job at the pentagon. ashton carter is on the list, and former nebraska senator chuck hagel, a republican, could represent a reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> reporter: treasury secretary tim geithner said he will stay at his post until at least inauguration. president obama's chief of staff jack lew is often named as a possible replacement. a poll asked if president obama would pick good cabinet members. 58% said they thought he would. 42% said he would n
, will maduro be the same? remains to be seen. he was the ambassador for the united nations. he lived in america for many, many years. does that alter his sensibility? >> do you think that may make him a bit more liberal so to speak in terms of relations? >> one does wonder. and, again, when the end of the chavez era ends, be it now or lat late,er, will things remain the same or bechanged remains to be seen. >> do you think there's be a sense of fear that he said that, that something they happen to him, that the cancer is back in full force? >> it's interesting you say that. he seems to be very emotional. he was crying talking about his cancer. and during his election he said, i have been kurd. you saw him out there in full force making long speeches. since virtually october we haven't seen him. so how ill he is, we don't know. you said it earlier. you said he's obviously very scared and with this kind of cancer and surgery, you don't know, but the best oncologists, again, one of those stories we'll be following very closely. >> nadia, always great to talk to you. >> and i'll be seeing you later
you think the attitude would change. >> well it's interesting, because he was the united nations ambassador. he lived in america for many years, he's a firm advocate, a confidant, his vice president, and his foreign minister. >> and he seemed to get emotional, do you think it means he got news that he will announce down the road? >> we have seen him this emotional before. he was elected in october, and he said he was in complete remission. in april. he had a very moving ceremony. so we have seen that before. certainly there must be something that happened that he heard that will involve surgery. >> i thought that would be a given that the vp is his successor. is he doing it for more his team, saying if it does happen, he will be in my place. >> he wants to make sure that if he is out for a period of time, that someone that endorses him will be in his position. so we'll watch very closely. >> thank you, we will. now we want to go to patrick otman joining us from havana, what's the reaction in cuba? >> absolutely, it was shown here last night, and hugo chavez is such a close, close
and the united nations. prime minister, thanks, as usual, for joining us. >> thank you, wolf. >> good to see you the other day in jerusalem. let's talk about what's happening in the middle east right now. the u.s., the obama administration, nato now obviously very concerned about the regime of president assad potentially using chemical weapons, poison gas against its own people. here's the question, what is the difference killing civilians in syria with bombs from jet fighters or attack helicopters as opposed to using say poison gas or chemical warfare? >> that's a good question. in one sense in moral terms, there is no difference and almost 40,000 people have died in syria already. but i think the use of chemical weapons and poison gas, i think the fatalities would be very much greater. and it does cross a line. these aren't judgments that you can make in any scientific way. but i think what your administration, the international community is signaling to president assad, if you cross that line, there will be a strong reaction. >> those are tough words coming from president obama, from secretar
as the united states is concerned. the president over at the national defense university was celebrating today. he was celebrating what was create a program to eliminate nuclear weapons that were a leftover after the collapse of the soviet union. the u.s. provides lots of money and experts to help with the job. the program's responsible for deactivating more than 7,000 nuclear warheads over the past two decades, in addition, some 900 intercontinental ballistic missiles and 6.5 million pounds of chemical weapons material have been destroyed thanks to the program. >>> hillary clinton has served president obama for four years as secretary of state. four years from now, could she be moving into her boss' office over at the white house? after this weekend, a lot more people are beginning to speculate about what hillary clinton is planning to do. our "strategy session," james carville and mary matlin, are both standing by live. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit m
including the united nations kyoto protocol would not impact the temperatures assuming you buy into their science. >> we're not talking about the temperature. >> we're talking about a climate bill in the united states. president obama was telling people it will keep the planet four or five degrees cooler for our grandchildren. if you actually do -- >> co2 -- >> -- you are getting 1,000 plus cold plants, there are 1.3 billion people don't have running water and electricity. if we actually go the route of trying to stop carbon-based energy which has been their lifeline which would lower infant mortality and long life expectancy it would be the most immoral position you can take. bottom line is even if skeptics are wrong the solutions that the global warming alarmists would propose would have not detectible impact. >> if we were to begin to reduce carbon emissions, have the united states for example lead the way in this new technology, especially energy transmission, energy storage, electricity, we could change the world. we could get everybody a much higher quality of life than t
the united nations suggests there are 110 million active mines scattered across 70 countries with equal numbers stockpiled around the world still waiting to be planted. that is alarming and shocking to me. but the exhibit, i just want to point out that the inventor of this technology is looking to raise money to mass produce it on a grand scale. and there will be an exhibit for our viewers who are in new york and they can see that in march and in 2013 at the museum of modern art. >> very cool. to me it sounds like a very good idea. i don't know the specifics behind it, but anything you can do to clear the mines, i mean, obviously it will help. >> especially given how big of a problem it still continues to be. >> thank you, appreciate it. >>> so which list are you on, santa's naughty or nice list? i know which one i'm on, always. a we all just born on the naughty list? that's next. ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it
there now so dangerous, the united nations announced today it is immediately pulling all nonessential employees out of syria. arwa damon, one of the few western journalists inside syria right now. you have been to aleppo, where the assad regime has a chemical weapons plant. let's get perspective from the ground and start with the regime. what is it saying about this new u.s. intelligence and now new warnings from the united states all the way up to president obama about a red line on the use of chemical weapons? >> reporter: well, the regime has historically denied that it would use any sort of chemical weapons against its own population, but that is something of an empty promise, at least from the perspective of everyone we have been speaking to about this. many of those fighters that we talked on the ground do say they do believe the greater the strangle hold they have on regime forces in the city of aleppo grows, the greater the likelihood is that in a desperate attempt to somehow either regain control or wreak mass havoc on the population, the regime would not hesitate when it com
uk burglars have no fears of getting shot by the homeowner. according to the united nations, scotland is the most violent industrialized country in the world. one of the reasons scotland is so violent is because the government in london has disabled the scots from being able to protect themselves against violent criminals. >> look me in the eye down this camera lens and tell me scotland is more dangerous than america, when you have 12,000 gun murders a year and 300 million guns, it's time, mr. kopel, to wake up and smell the cappuccino. got to leave it there. i'm sure we will debate this again. thank you both very much. >> thanks for having me. >>> joining me now exclusively to talk about the players' side of the story is former new york jets quarterback and hall of famer, joe namath. joe, welcome back. >> thank you, piers. good to be with you, buddy. >> it's an awful story, this, in so many ways and it raises a number of issues, gun control, we've just been debating on the show, the issue of concussion for top football players and the side effects, the issue perhaps of depression, of
not factual in what he said, because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean zero ability, to order or to tell or to -- i mean, they can suggest. but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> tonight, many disability rights advocates are saying politics trump the welfare of the disabled everywhere. seven-term democratic congressman of rhode island is among the many supporters of the u.n. treaty, the first quadriplegic person to serve in the u.s. house. before yesterday's vote he talked with former senator bob dole in the senate chamber. the congressman joins me now. you voted for this treaty. you joined senator mccain and kerry earlier this week calling for its ratification. why do you think it's so important? >> first, anderson, thank you for having me on the program. thank you for paying attention to this very important issue. this issue is important, not just for people here in the united states, but most especially for people around the world who don't yet enjoy the same protections that people -- disabled peopl
by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary general ban ki moon, he is visiting camps in jordan and turkey, calling for more international assistance for these refugees, and warning also that the numbers could dramatically increase in just the next month or two if the conflict drags on. for the people here, well, it's only december. we've been here an hour or two, and i'm freezing from the freezing rain here. it's just the beginning of december. winter is coming. ivan watson, cnn, on the syrian border. >> the man has been arrested and charged with trying to give classified information about u.s. submarines to russia. more on the seemingly cold war era story up next. anncr: some politicians seem to think medicare and... social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the
to harsh reactions both from the united nations as well as countries around the world. nevertheless, israel says it stands by its decision and will not be deterred by international pressure. >>> west bank settlements like this one look almost like any other city in israel with schools, malls, and supermarkets, but they're on land, and the international community says it should be negotiated about as part of a future palestinian state. the mayor tells me he believes israel has every right to expand. >> this place, this -- it is in municipality -- a government land that has to be built for our -- >> reporter: others are more blunt. it should be joined to jerusalem, this man says. that way the arabs can't take their part of jerusalem. whether or not the construction goes forward, this will remain one of the many thorny issues between israelis and palestinians. fred, cnn in the west bank. >>> this is a beautiful place, so beautiful that actually nobody can afford to live here. we're going to take you inside this ghost town. it's in africa built by chinese investors. is a complete multivitamin0+
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